In Sudan they put tea into sugar

With Amir, I was agreed to show me how it was in the village of Nuri. He was once a soldier, but then he returned to his native village and began to feed himself as a farmer. He saddled his donkey and then said, “Get on.” We headed for Nile, along which leads to other villages.

He jumped and let me drive the donkey. I was kidnapped. I took my hand restrainingly, swinging with them and calling for a hush. The donkey started. Amir ran before me and filmed me. I felt like a good farmer and enjoyed excitement.

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The first stop was at a ramp with a huge pump that pumped water from the Nile into the canal by means of irrigating the adjacent fields. Then he showed me local camels and buffaloes. The path offered magnificent views of the Nile, the palm jungle and the remote rocky hills in the desert.

We stopped at the brick factory. The boys were from southern Sudan. One kid was throwing a pile of dirt stuck together. He placed the second clay in the metal mold, and the third placed it into the space where it dried. I’ve tried out the individual assignments that I think it’s all about. The water was pumped from a nearby well using a pump made in India.

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We returned to Amir’s house. He showed me a garden where bananas are growing. One banana plant just matured and cut it off, put it on the ground and covered its leaves. The bananas were still green, but he said they would be just in three days. In his garden there were also young mangots growing up for sale.

He invited me to my father’s house. His father was 83. He was lying on the bed and reading a book. As part of my basic Arabic, we talked about old times like Czechoslovakia, the Soviet Union, and Hitler. They asked me why no one goes to Sudan. I told them that people are watching TV and are afraid of the war. They told me to see people coming and they would show them the “war”.

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This was followed by an invitation to a breakfast that is mostly in Sudan around 10-12. clock. We had a sauce of cornflakes with corn flour, French fries, chicken pieces, cucumber salad, fried toasted peas, egg and, of course, beans and Sudan bread. As a dessert, bio bananas – all of which we washed with hot tea.

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After lunch, Amir discovered that his donkey had fled. There was no wonder, it’s just donkey. I did not hold back and started laughing while Amir was worried. But he threw it behind our heads and set off again. Unusually for me, I stood in front of the camera, and Amir softened her photographic tastes. Well, I had to admit he had a feeling for it, because some of his photos were really good.

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Amira’s customer came to young mangrove, so I helped him put them in the car. I was glad that at last I could be useful when they care for me so royal. I came home. Before the sunset came Omar, who lived next door and brought me dinner.

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I had a chicken broth with squeezed lemon, rice, fried eggplant, vegetable sauce and bread. I ate the dosyta and was very happy. But I did not know that after dinner at around 21 o’clock there would be another dinner. It was not royal, but this time divine.

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OOn the largest tray I’ve ever seen in my life, they brought a terrible stack of food. True, it was for many people, but I did not have room anymore. It was absolutely impossible to reject. The fact that I already had dinner once was not taken into consideration at all. I honestly agreed that I was always tasting every meal. As soon as I started eating, I began to squeeze the pieces of meals under my nose, giving the guest respect.

It was very nice, but I was not supposed to give the food. I had something to eat and I was glad I did not crack. Then she was followed by tea with milk to which the Sudanese gave an incredible amount of sugar. Sometimes I thought they were drinking tea in a glass full of sugar. I thought if I missed my diabetes that night, never again.

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